Athena Swan

Athena Swan promotes and supports the careers of women in Science, Engineering and Technology (STEM), and aims to address gender inequalities and imbalance in these disciplines and, in particular, the under-representation of women in senior roles.

Tuesday, 22 November 2016

IOP - International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP)

The International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP) will take place on 16-20 July 2017 at the University of Birmingham, UK. 


On behalf of the Midlands Physics Alliance and the Institute of Physics, we would like to invite you to participate in the sixth IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (ICWIP 2017) to be held at the University of Birmingham in July 2017. This is the first time the conference has been held in the UK, and will include an outstanding programme for women in physics attracting a truly international participation. The aim of the conference is to agree a set of resolutions, which will be presented at the IUPAP General Assembly. Recommendations from the conference will be sent to physics institutions and professional bodies world-wide. To find out more about the conference, visit the conference website.
Teams from all over the world will be attending as representatives of their country. The UK will be sending a substantial team, led by Dr Barbara Gabrys (Oxford) and Dr Jess Wade (Imperial College). To accommodate an international delegation, there are a limited number of places available to be part of the UK team.
Applications to be part of our team are now being invited from all those involved in physics in the UK with an interest in the issues of women in physics: physics departments, schools, research institutes and companies. Being part of our team will give you a chance to share your practice and experience on an international stage, hearing from and meeting delegates from across the world. Alongside gaining ideas and recommendations for you to implement in your own working environment, you will have a chance to influence and contribute to the UK report.
Applying is easy – just send us your details (name, job, location, area of physics, etc.) and a short statement (no more than 500 words) on why you would like to attend this conference, highlighting some or all of the following:
• Your involvement in women in science activities within your school, department, university or organisation
• Your involvement with activities to promote gender diversity and/ or public engagement
• Your particular interest in this area
• You can include a CV if you wish
Please email your statement to Barbara (barbara.gabrys@materials.ox.ac.uk) or Jess (jessica.wade08@imperial.ac.uk) by 15 December 2016. We will reply to all expressions of interest in the new year.
Please note, for your own budgeting purposes: the conference is likely to cost between £500-£600 (conference fee plus accommodation) plus any associated travel expenses. The conference fee allows us to invite scientists from developing nations. It will be worth the cost to share your own practise, expertise, and to hear from the international community of women in physics.
Please contact Barbara or Jess if you have any queries.

Friday, 14 October 2016

New chairman of SEES Athena SWAN committee

It is our pleasure to announce that Dr David Franklin is our new chairman of the SEES Athena SWAN committee. Together with the Athena SWAN committee, members of the school and Prof. Strachan, David will coordinate the application process of our Athena SWAN departmental application. Work is currently on-going on new data collection and preparation of the final application.     

Friday, 5 August 2016

Our Athena SWAN Bronze Award

It is regrettable to inform you that our Departmental Bronze Award application was unsuccessful.
We are making renewed efforts to resubmit in November round.

I also stepped down from my role as Athena SWAN Departmental Coordinator and the HoD, Prof. Rob Strachan, will coordinate all our Athena SWAN activities including the November re-submission. I will, however, continue to serve as a member of the SEES Athena SWAN Committee and I will continue to run our Athena SWAN blog.

Monday, 14 March 2016

Athena SWAN Conference, 27 April 2016 - University of Portsmouth


The Athena SWAN Conference 2016 is rapidly approaching. This year it is 'Athena SWAN for all' and will focus on our successes, how a Gold Award department functions and discuss the way forward for Athena SWAN and what the enhanced process means for those academics and researchers working in non-STEM areas along with the inclusion of Professional and Support staff.
I would encourage as many as possible to attend.
Details of the event are included at the link:


Tuesday, 8 March 2016

International Women’s Day

Today is International Women’s Day, so from our Athena Swan team a Happy Women's Day to all our SEES female staff and beyond.
  













To celebrate this, Dr Edith Rogers has prepared a nice cake. Please help yourself with a piece of cake, which is located in the staff room on the 4th floor, Burnaby Building.  
Happy women's Day!

Tuesday, 1 March 2016

University of Oxford Females in STEM will host its 5th Annual Conference

The University of Oxford Females in Engineering, Science and Technology will host its 5th Annual Conference for Undergraduate and Postgraduate Women in STEM. There are still some places left to attend the conference and so we ask that you please advertise the conference among your students and encourage them to apply. 

The day will be packed full with a stimulating range of talks, interactive workshops and a panel discussion all centred on which career options are available for you as an undergraduate or a young researcher, what steps to take next and how to maximise your potential and achieve your career goals within STEM. There will also be plenty of opportunities to network and share and discuss experiences with both peers and STEM’s most prominent figures.

This event promises to be filled with exciting activities that will open your eyes to the range of roles of women in the scientific world and will present an exciting opportunity for you to be inspired, acquire vital skills, widen your network of connections and be motivated to go out and pursue your goals and careers.

Thursday, 25 February 2016

Royal Society Athena Prize 2016

Nominations are now open for the Royal Society Athena Prize 2016.

The Prize is a new national award which recognises individuals and teams in the UK research community who have contributed towards the advancement of diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

The award aims to inspire innovation and leadership in diversity issues and joins the Society’s prestigious set of medals and awards announced each summer. The winner/s of the prize receives a medal and a gift of £5,000 and runners-up will receive a gift of £1,000.

Please do look around your institution and think of who you might nominate for the prize. Do you know someone who has set up an innovative project that is contributing to the advancement of diversity in STEM and should be recognised for their efforts? This is an opportunity to celebrate those inspirational individuals and teams who are leading the way by putting diversity at the heart of everything they do.

The closing date for nominations is 6pm Tuesday 29 March 2016. I would be grateful if you could circulate this call for nominations to your networks and contacts.

Sunday, 21 February 2016

Why Sexism at the Office Makes Women Love Hillary Clinton (NY Times Op-Ed)

Even for women active in feminist causes in college, as I was a dozen years ago, that can be a rude awakening. As a young lawyer, one of the first things I noticed about department meetings at my law firm was not just the dearth of female partners, but that one of the few female partners always seemed to be in charge of ordering lunch. I listened as some of my male colleagues opined on the need to marry a woman who would stay home with the children — that wasn’t sexist, they insisted, because it wasn’t that they thought only women should stay home; it was just that somebody had to, and the years in which they planned on having children would be crucial ones for their own careers.
I saw that the older white, male partners who mentored the younger white, male associates were able to work long days and excel professionally precisely because their stay-at-home wives took care of everything else; I saw that virtually none of the female partners had a similar setup.
In jobs that followed, managers would remark that they wanted “more women” and proceed to reject qualified candidates. (Similar dynamics took place with minority candidates.) There were always reasons — not the right cultural fit, not the right experience, a phenomenon of unintentional sexism now well documented in controlled studies. I watched as men with little or irrelevant experience were hired and promoted, because they had such great ideas, or they fit in better. “We want a woman,” the conclusion seemed to be, “just not this woman.”
Watching a primary election in which an eminently qualified woman long assumed to be a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination faces a serious challenge from an older white guy with exciting ideas, many women my age and older hear something familiar, and personal, in the now-common refrain about Hillary Clinton: “I want a woman president, just not this woman president.”

Read the full piece here.

Saturday, 20 February 2016

The Stereotype Trap (CogTales blog)

That women in science and in the professional world in general are subject to gender biases with real consequences (lower pay, less career opportunities) goes without saying.
In this context, I find it important to be aware of how easy it is to be biased myself. Not in order to justify, but to better understand. I have recently made two experiences with my own and fellow female researchers’ biases, in situations where I somewhat slipped into a man’s skin.
Now, slapping on my man skin aka MetaLab poster for the BCCCD conference, I got one female researcher who looked, mumbled  “Oh, oh, this looks complicated!”, and left. There was another one who actually started talking to me but who stated, before I could even open my mouth: “I am not sure I will understand this. It looks very difficult.” Granted, this is a sample of N=2 (although Christina just told me that she got similar reactions exclusively by women on a similar poster recently), and there were many others that did not say anything like this. Nevertheless, I had never gotten any such reaction on any other project. So man skin experience #1 showed me a few examples of women having a that’s-too-complicated-for-me-bias against themselves.
Well, you might say, this man skin isn’t too convincing. But I have an even better one. It’s my first name. First names ending in ‘o’ are, across many cultures, associated with men rather than women. I think I first got painfully aware of this when the Russian family friend persistently called me “Shoa”, because he just didn’t want to deal with the fact that a little girl’s name ended with an “o”. Fast-forward, and I keep receiving an uncountable amount of mail addressed to “Mr./Herr/Dhr./M. Tsuji”, and recently this involuntary man skin, actually in combination with the MetaLab man skin, culminated in me being imagined as an “over 40-year-old single guy who watches porn movies in his free time.”

Read the full post here.

Friday, 19 February 2016

Early Career Scientist news from the European Association of Geochemistry


Early Career Science Ambassador Program: deadline coming up

The Early Career Science Ambassador Program supports scientists based in Europe, in the final stages of their PhD or within 6 years post PhD, to attend conferences outside Europe (except Goldschmidt), by covering 50% of their expenses, up to 2000 Euros. The next application deadline is 1 March.
 
Travel bursaries for workshop on Highly Siderophile Elements

EAG is a proud co-sponsor of the 4th International Highly Siderophile Element Geochemistry Workshop taking place at the University of Durham, UK, on 11-15 July 2016, and we'd like to remind students that travel bursaries are available. Abstract and registration deadline is 4 March.
 
Environmental Mineralogy Group Early Career Bursary Scheme
The Environmental Mineralogy Group of the Mineralogical Society launches a £500 bursary for Early Career researchers in the disciplines of environmental, applied, and bio mineralogy to facilitate ‘seed corn’ research, develop ‘pump priming’ ideas, support career development, and commercialisation of research into industry. Read more.

University of Portsmouth celebrates International Women’s Day (Staff Essentials)

The University of Portsmouth celebrates International Women’s Day with the following talks and film screenings:

Female Philanthropy and the Inter-War World in Twentieth-Century Britain
Date: Tuesday 8 March 2016
Time: 5.15pm
Venue: Dennis Sciama, Room 2.14
Dr. Eve Colpus, Lecturer in British and European History Post 1850 at Southampton University, will speak on ‘Female Philanthropy and the Inter-War World in Twentieth-Century Britain’, organised by the Women’s and Gender Studies Research Cluster, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences. No booking needed. All are welcome!

International Women’s Day Film and Talk
Date: Thursday 10 March 2016
Time: 6.30pm talk, 7.00pm screening
Venue: Eldon Screening Theatre, Winston Churchill Avenue, Portsmouth PO1 2DJ
The screening of Suffragette and talk by Professor June Purvis, a world-renowned expert on the subject and who advised the filmmakers.
Admission is free, but please reserve your place on Eventbrite.

Make More Noise (UK, 1899-1917) Cert | 80 min
Date: Thursday 31 March 2016
Time: 7.00pm
Venue: Eldon Screening Theatre, Winston Churchill Avenue, Portsmouth PO1 2DJ
Cinema was born as the Suffragettes campaign was gathering momentum, and so they made it there business to get in front of the camera. A fascinating compilation of 21 short films from the BFI national archive that show how these women were being portrayed on screen.

Tickets £6 from http://www.portsmouthfilmsociety.org.uk/tickets/.

Thursday, 18 February 2016

MSA Mineralogy/Petrology grants for students

The Mineralogical Society of America invites undergraduate and graduate student applications for a Grant for Student Research in Mineralogy and Petrology. This grant seeks to support innovative research by students. The next deadline for proposal submission is June 1, 2016.

At least two awards of up to $5,000 each are given each year. Students, including graduate and undergraduate students, are encouraged to apply. However, all proposals are considered together. The award selection will be based on the qualifications of the applicant, the quality, innovativeness, and scientific significance of the research, and the likelihood of success of the project. Applicants may not apply for both this and the MSA Grant for Research in Crystallography in the same year.

The grant is for research-related expenses only. Travel to meetings, conferences, short courses, non-research fieldtrips, tuition, non-research living (room and board) expenses, overhead or indirect costs, etc. are not suitable uses of the money. Neither should the money be used for salary or wages for the researcher. Proposals that make such requests will not be considered further. The successful applicant will also be asked in the year following grant to write a short summary of how the money was spent.

Additional information about the grants is at http://www.minsocam.org/msa/Awards/Min_Pet_Award.html.

Associate Professorship at Uni. Graz (women only)


To increase the share of female academic personnel among the group of associate professors at Graz University of Technology (TU Graz), the Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Geodesy advertises a vacancy for 1 university assistant with doctorate, tenure track, initially limited to 6 years, with the possibility of a qualification agreement. 40 hours/week, intended to be filled by 1st of May 2016, at the Institute of Geodesy, for women.

Minimal qualification:
Doctorate degree in the field of satellite geodesy or related disciplines in earth systems research.

Desirable qualifications:
The advertised position is located at the interface between geodesy and the geosciences. The candidate should be renowned in at least one of the following fields: Interpretation of space geodetic data in earth system studies; separation of different processes from integral signals; numerical modelling of components of the dynamic system earth.

The candidate is expected to have the ability to acquire funding for and execute scientific research projects, to organize scientific events, to work in a team, and to cooperate with her colleagues. Experience in university level teaching and the supervision of scientific thesis work is desirable.

Full advert here.

From the Researcher's Network (via Nicola Haines)

If you're working on promoting your research (and yourself!) on social media here are some links to hints and tips:

http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/Funding/Public-engagement/Engagement-with-your-research/Support-and-resources/Online-and-social-media/index.htm

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2013/07/26/a-to-z-of-social-media-for-academia/

http://www.scilogs.com/the-leap/some-academics-still-dont-get-social-media/

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2016/01/25/how-to-write-a-blogpost-from-your-journal-article/

http://socialscienceresearchfunding.co.uk/?p=835

Tuesday, 16 February 2016

Professional appointment for SEES Senior Lecturer Michelle Bloor

Dear All,
Congratulations are due to Michelle Bloor who is the incoming President of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC), UK Branch! She takes the helm from September 2016 and will stay on as Vice President until then.
Rob Strachan

SEPM Student Participation Grants



SEPM has established a new student presentation/travel grant program entitled SEPM Student Participation Grants. These grants provide travel funds for students that have abstracts accepted to SEPM 'approved' meetings and conferences.  An 'approved' meeting is one that SEPM has reviewed and endorses the topic, program and operating organization. Full details available here.
 
The rules for applying for an SEPM Student Participation Grant are:

1. Grants are only awarded to attend 'approved' meetings (see the list link on the webpage)
2. Applicants must be SEPM Student Members in good standing for at least 6 months prior to the application.
3. Students can only receive one grant per year
4. Deadline for an application is two months prior to the meeting
5. Applicants must have an accepted presentation abstract (poster or oral) that can be verified by the meeting organizers
6. There are limited number of grants per meeting and all grants are awarded based on merit and application date
7. Grants are limited to $300 for meetings local to the applicant and $500 for more distant meetings (determined by the review committee).

Double-edged words: The secret meaning of “feisty” (Economist)

WOMEN and men face double-standards. That this should show up in the language is no surprise. Men who put themselves forward at work are “assertive”, women who do the same are more often “pushy” or “bossy”; men are “persistent” whereas women are “nagging”; men are “frustrated”, women “upset”. A man has a lot to say; a woman is “chatty”. A man discusses the doings of his colleagues and rivals; a woman “gossips”.

Readers tempted to doubt can check for themselves. For an impressionistic survey, type “gossip” into Google, click on “images” and see who appears to be doing it; then try the same with “nagging” and “bossy”. For hard data, try Google’s “Ngram” viewer, which shows the frequency of words and phrases among the hundreds of billions of words in the books scanned by Google, spanning centuries. One of the most common words following “gossiping” is “old”. And the most common words to follow “gossiping old” are, in this order: “women”, “woman”, “men”, “lady” and “ladies”.

Read the full article here.

Big computers, big hair: the women of Bell Labs in the 1960s – in pictures (Guardian)

In 1967, Lawrence ‘Larry’ Luckham was an operations manager at Bell Labs in Oakland, California. He brought a camera into work to capture a day in the life at a company churning out some of the biggest technological advances of the decade.

See the photo exhibit here.

Watching the heavens: The female pioneers of science - BBC News

As the bombs fell on London during the Great War, two women kept a vigil of the night sky. Fiammetta Wilson and Grace Cook observed shooting stars - the chunks of space rock that light up the sky as they plummet to Earth. They kept up records of meteors in what was then very much a man's world.
In 1916, the pair were among the first four women to be awarded fellowship of The Royal Astronomical Society - a milestone in the acceptance of women in science. Although their names have largely been forgotten, the first female fellows of the society are being remembered 100 years on.
Dr Mandy Bailey is an astronomer at the Open University and a member of the Royal Astronomical Society council. She says Fiammetta Wilson and Grace Cook ensured scientific work on meteor observations continued while their male colleagues were off fighting a war. "In the years between 1910 and 1920 Wilson observed somewhere in the region of 10,000 meteors and accurately calculated the paths of about 650 of them - no small achievement!" she says.

Read the full story here.

Royal Astronomical Society early career funding

Fowler awards
The Royal Astronomical Society invites nominations for the Fowler awards. These are awarded to individuals who have made a noteworthy contribution to the astronomical and geophysical sciences at an early stage of their research career.

Candidates may be of any nationality, however significant parts of the work should have been carried out in the UK or with facilities in which the UK has a recognised interest. Applicants should have completed their PhD no more than 10 years preceding the time of application.Two prizes, worth £500 each, are available.

More details here.


Winton Capital awards
The Royal Astronomical Society invites nominations for the Winton Capital awards. These recognise researchers in astronomy and geophysics whose career has shown the most promising development.

Candidates should have completed their PhD no more than five years preceding the time of nomination.Prizes are worth £1,000 each.

More details here.

Deadlines for both 31 July.