Athena Swan

Athena Swan promotes and supports the careers of women in Science, Engineering and Technology (STEM), and aims to address gender inequalities and imbalance in these disciplines and, in particular, the under-representation of women in senior roles.

Friday, 29 August 2014

SEES Athena Swan Committee welcomes new member

We are pleased to announce that Dr Stephanie Sargeant has joined our Athena Swan SEES Committee. She is going to contribute to the Development of our Actions Plan.  

Wednesday, 27 August 2014

In the news

When women have it all - Science, 27 August 2014
By: Jyoti Mishra

I grew up in urban India in a middle class family, the daughter of two hard-working professional parents, both physicians. They never objected when I did mostly what boys did then, like be the only girl in astronomy camp. My closest friends were boys; we formed study groups and competed for the best grades. In college I pursued biology and my class was suddenly predominantly female. It didn’t last: When I pursued graduate school in the United States, studying a hybrid of computational sciences and neurosciences, I was the only woman in my international class.

Read more here.

Wednesday, 20 August 2014

In the news

Sexual harassment: Create ethics codes to curb sex abuse - Nature, 14 August 2014
By: Margaret C. Hardy

A survey published last month found evidence of alarming levels of sexual violence (towards 26% of women and 6% of men) in the course of fieldwork by life scientists (see Nature http://doi.org/t3n; 2014). Meanwhile, more than 50 US higher-education institutions are under investigation for their handling of complaints of such incidents. As a rape survivor and scientist, I suggest measures that could help to counteract this situation.

Read more here.

Tuesday, 19 August 2014

In the news

Equally productive women are tenured less - Science, 18 August 2014
By: Beryl Lieff Benderly

Why are women underrepresented in the ranks of tenured faculty? The reason isn’t lower productivity, according to a new study presented 17 August at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association. Women received tenure less often than men with equal productivity in three disciplines studied by Kate Weisshaar, a Ph.D. student in sociology at Stanford University.

Read more here.

Friday, 15 August 2014

In the news

Nearly 40 percent of women leave engineering - Science, 15 August 2014

Engineering fields, from aerospace to biotech, have a history of struggling to recruit and retain women. Past studies have blamed those struggles on women’s lack of confidence and the demands of family. But a study released last weekend at the 122nd Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association in Washington, D.C., shows that nearly 40% of women left the field after earning an engineering degree, many due to hostile work climates, unsupportive supervisors, or limited opportunities for advancement.

Read more here.

Wednesday, 13 August 2014

In the news

Harassment in Science, Replicated - NY Times, 13 August 2014
By:

In the news

First female winner for Fields maths medal - BBC News, 13 August 2014
By:

An Iranian mathematician working in the US has become the first ever female winner of the celebrated Fields Medal. In a landmark hailed as "long overdue", Prof Maryam Mirzakhani was recognised for her work on complex geometry.

Read more here.

Sunday, 10 August 2014

In the news

Deadlier than the male - Geoscientist, August 2014
By: Ted Nield

It’s official.  Tropical cyclones of the North Atlantic – hurricanes, to you and me – are more deadly if they are more ‘Victoria’ than ‘Victor’.  A study by scientists at the Illinois and Arizona State universities, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, revealed in June that - even excluding outliers like Katrina and Audrey - of the 47 most damaging hurricanes since 1950, those with feminine names killed on average 45 people, compared to 23 deaths in ‘masculine’ storms. 

Read more here.

The Geological Society Careers Days

Free events for students (pre-registration required) to meet other students and consider future career options. Held in November in Nottingham (5/11) and Edinburgh (26/11); lunch and drink provided.

More details here.

Wednesday, 6 August 2014

In the news

How did Lego become a gender battleground? - BBC News, 6 August 2014


Three new Lego figures - all female scientists - have been unveiled. But why does the toymaker's portrayal of women provoke such controversy?

A palaeontologist, an astronomer, a chemist - into the pantheon of children's toys stride three new Lego characters. Not so surprising. Except the scientists are all female. 

...

The Research Institute set was proposed by geoscientist Ellen Kooijman and backed in a public vote on a Lego crowdsourcing website. Kooijman has written that she wanted to counter "a skewed male/female minifigure ratio and a rather stereotypical representation of the available female figures". She is pleased with the result.  

Read more here.